bikemike

Tapered glasses and stuff

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30 minutes ago, darcshadow said:

The problem with just subtracting is it is only correct if your design has equal height and width. If for example the design in your example was only 0.41" tall to start with now it's height is 0. The correct height for the new width should be 0.35.

You need to shrink the height by the same percentage as the apparent width shrank. So in your example the actual width is 2.83, the perceived width is 2.42 so that a change of 85.5%. So shrink the height by the same percentage and the image should then look correctly, when viewed straight on.

Actually, it is a 14.5% shrink in the height.

That would get our numbers a LOT closer than the subtraction. As in the same numbers.

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I have changed the calculations in my post. Thanks to darcshadow for the input and his calculations.

Hopefully, one way or the other you will be able to work it out.

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WOW!!!!!!  Ya'll are going DEEP...................

I just add about 12% to the width when I'm dealing with a shape and I've never had a customer complain.    

 

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I need to re-look at  my equation from the other post, I think it maybe a bit off now.

One other thing to think of, using a percentage coverage might not be the best method. It gives you the max width for your image, but if your image is tall, when you resize it tot he calculated width it might be too tall for the glass.

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1 hour ago, darcshadow said:

I need to re-look at  my equation from the other post, I think it maybe a bit off now.

One other thing to think of, using a percentage coverage might not be the best method. It gives you the max width for your image, but if your image is tall, when you resize it tot he calculated width it might be too tall for the glass.

No, the height goes down. I think we are all going crazy. Lol. 

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2 hours ago, Go-C Graphics said:

WOW!!!!!!  Ya'll are going DEEP...................

I just add about 12% to the width when I'm dealing with a shape and I've never had a customer complain.    

 

And you somehow expect less? 

We do the best to come up with the simple solution. Lol, big time! 

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1 hour ago, bikemike said:

No, the height goes down. I think we are all going crazy. Lol. 

Ok, re-looked at my equation and I'm still happy with it.

Regarding your statement, yeah, the height will go down but if you start with a tall skinny image even after shrinking it down to the desired width it might still be too tall for the glass. 

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39 minutes ago, darcshadow said:

Ok, re-looked at my equation and I'm still happy with it.

Regarding your statement, yeah, the height will go down but if you start with a tall skinny image even after shrinking it down to the desired width it might still be too tall for the glass. 

Ya, that's where the "best guess' thing comes in.

I think we got everyone in the ball park.

So, exact math divided by best guess will get you there.

Print your work out, cut it out of the paper and have a look.

We got you close, y'all should be good to go.

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47 minutes ago, darcshadow said:

Ok, re-looked at my equation and I'm still happy with it.

Regarding your statement, yeah, the height will go down but if you start with a tall skinny image even after shrinking it down to the desired width it might still be too tall for the glass. 

Your not shrinking the width, you are shrinking the height.

Tall and skinny should not have much of an effect anyway. None of this math is set in stone. You still have to play a bit.

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