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  I'm a new to it all DIY'r that quite honestly needs a bit of direction on what to buy to get into custom wrapping? I'd like to start out with small things:, shirts, stickers, corn hole boards, small landscape trailers and possibly move onward and upward. For instance which type vinyl machine or even program will be best for 3 or 4 layering or colors in a design? Thanks for the help or any advice. I appreciate it.

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Hello Hello

Custom Wrapping? If you are going to be designing things in four colors, then PRINT, don't use cut vinyl.

The world has changed drastically in this business. The low cost of full-color large format vinyl prints makes what you are suggesting price-inefficient. Design your job, then farm it out to a wholesale printer. (ZooPrint for example)

Have you ever used a vector graphics program?

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Pretty much all of your questions can be answered right here.  Tons of valuable info.  Search box in upper right corner.  Of course starting out, it all depends on the budget that you have to spend.  Wrapping and cutting are two totally different avenues to take.   To wrap, take some classes.   Here is the UScutter buying guide.  But there are other cutters for sale also. 

https://www.uscutter.com/index/page/static/subpage/buying_guides_new

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I think the question is, what is your budget? The easiest answer is to buy the best you are willing to afford. Are you wanting to start smaller and then see where it goes for the bigger projects, or do you want to get a larger machine right off the bat, so if you eventually get jobs that size, you're ready to go.

You can do a lot of projects with a 28"/34" cutter. I would start with an SC machine or up. If you can afford a machine with a servo motor, that would be better - it's quieter and more accurate.

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28 minutes ago, slice&dice said:

Hello Hello

Custom Wrapping? If you are going to be designing things in four colors, then PRINT, don't use cut vinyl.

The world has changed drastically in this business. The low cost of full-color large format vinyl prints makes what you are suggesting price-inefficient. Design your job, then farm it out to a wholesale printer. (ZooPrint for example)

Have you ever used a vector graphics program?

No sorry. I am brand new to this all with cutters,  printers, programs, presses, vinyl work, screen print work. My main objective is to be my social clubs go to guy for our shirt, stickers, & whatever design and example would be this particular sticker. Also as a hobbies for extra money

20200724_204125.jpg

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32 minutes ago, haumana said:

I think the question is, what is your budget? The easiest answer is to buy the best you are willing to afford. Are you wanting to start smaller and then see where it goes for the bigger projects, or do you want to get a larger machine right off the bat, so if you eventually get jobs that size, you're ready to go.

You can do a lot of projects with a 28"/34" cutter. I would start with an SC machine or up. If you can afford a machine with a servo motor, that would be better - it's quieter and more accurate.

Yes I would like to start somewhat big just so I'm not restricting myself with size limits right off the bat. The 34" sounds like a good size. Money wise. I havent a clue how much everything would be but to throw a number out I'm comfortable with and I'm assuming you are speaking about just a cutter or printer? A 900 dollar limit would be alright for me.

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You cannot afford a printer.

That design you posted is not something you would want to pursue with a vinyl cutter.

Here, try this over the weekend ---

Download and install SignBlazer and take it out for a test-drive.

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So what I'm looking into is vinyl but what slice&dice is saying I need to do print? Lol that I'm unaware of. Lol

Would it hurt if I could ask for maybe a checklist to get started for a equipment basics. For instance vinyl I'm guessing I'll need a cutter, heat press, printer? AnD for print just a printer?

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Smitay, you are all over the place. Stop, take a deep breath, and focus on what you are being told.

There are many threads in this Forum regarding first-time purchases. In fact, there is an entire discussion section devoted to just that topic.

You presented a graphic that will make you absolutely crazy trying to do it in cut vinyl (especially at a small size).
 

THIS is the type of printer that the industry is moving towards, and they are expensive and have a whole range of other considerations of ownership.

Eco-solvent-wide-format-printer-with-dou

 

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the design you posted ... I would just hit up sticker mule for that. I don't have enough business to justify a wide format color solvent printer, cold laminator, and wide format cutter. That kind of stuff gets immediately outsourced to places like sticker mule.

to get a solvent printer/cutter will be way, way, way out of your budget. you might want to check into how much some of the materials that you're wanting to buy will be, because some of them will not be cheap. $900 for an entire setup: cutter, heat press, vinyl, squeegee, pick, app tape, etc. It will all add up.

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Yes. I'm soo sorry for that. I just wanted to Jump right into things but I'm absolutely brand new to this. So vinyl I suppose I will stick to. I've seen cutters and a 27" or a 34" would be nice to start with?

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12 minutes ago, smitay said:

Yes. I'm soo sorry for that. I just wanted to Jump right into things but I'm absolutely brand new to this. So vinyl I suppose I will stick to. I've seen cutters and a 27" or a 34" would be nice to start with?

"So vinyl I suppose I will stick to."  -- Funny!

Download the program I linked above. Play with it for a while. Get a feel for that front-end of the work flow.

Vinyl comes in standard widths -- 24 and 30 primarily. As a rule, my designs are created  22" wide for 24 material and 28" for 30.
If you have room in your physical location for the 30 unit, that's fine. You'll also need app tape that's 30, and a table to work on.

Not sure why, but the Titan series doesn't offer a 30" (34)machine.

The entry-level machine you might want to plunk down cash for is the 34" LP3.  (currently unavailable, out of stock) ---  How soon are you wanting to get going?

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3 minutes ago, slice&dice said:

"So vinyl I suppose I will stick to."  -- Funny!

Download the program I linked above. Play with it for a while. Get a feel for that front-end of the work flow.

Vinyl comes in standard widths -- 24 and 30 primarily. As a rule, my designs are created  22" wide for 24 material and 28" for 30.
If you have room in your physical location for the 30 unit, that's fine. You'll also need app tape that's 30, and a table to work on.

Not sure why, but the Titan series doesn't offer a 30" (34)machine.

The entry-level machine you might want to plunk down cash for is the 34" LP3.  (currently unavailable, out of stock) ---  How soon are you wanting to get going?

Well considering I'm brand new to this venue maybe not ASAP but I would like to buy hopefully in the coming 2-4 weeks.

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4 minutes ago, MZ SKEETER said:

You haven't stated what computer operating system that you have.  This will work for both Mac and Windows though. 

Currently I'm operating a windows 10 

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OK, this is the INTRODUCTIONS part of the Forum. (Where are you from? What type of work are you looking to accomplish, etc.)
So, now you've revealed the basics of your situation, so perhaps the best thing for you at this point is to start a new thread topic within the section for Pre-Sale questions. Beyond the cutter, you also need to evaluate the heat-press side of things. That's another level of discussion.

The LP3 is a good unit to get, but only the USCutter reps (not here) can really answer when they'll have 'em again.

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Decide whether or not your really want to get a heat press right off the bat. If you do, then that will take up some of your budget for the cutter. The you're budgeting $900 for the cutter alone, then USC currently has a Titan 2 (servo motor) that's refurb'd in it's Outlet section. That's going to be the cheapest servo cutter you're going to get at USC for now.

If you need some wiggle room in the $900 for the cutter and various other things, then the Titan is a very good start. The cutter will be what makes or breaks your business, so get the best one that you can afford, without it - you have no business.

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$895 is the starting point to get things running with a (refurb.) Titan II 24" --    if you have the money on hand, just put in the order and take the plunge. (Don't forget to add squeegees, picking tool, scissors, app-tape dispenser, app tape, and of course, some vinyl)

 

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the plotter is the heart of the operation so if you can start out with a good unit that is always best - many of us started with entry level units and worked our way up - learning a lot from those units until we could move up to the servo machines that are quieter and very accurate.

 

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13 hours ago, slice&dice said:

OK, this is the INTRODUCTIONS part of the Forum. (Where are you from? What type of work are you looking to accomplish, etc.)
So, now you've revealed the basics of your situation, so perhaps the best thing for you at this point is to start a new thread topic within the section for Pre-Sale questions. Beyond the cutter, you also need to evaluate the heat-press side of things. That's another level of discussion.

The LP3 is a good unit to get, but only the USCutter reps (not here) can really answer when they'll have 'em again.

Okay sorry again. Names chris from the northeastern part of Pennsylvania. I am a local operating engineer. What I'm looking to do is supply my local unions with union made products albeit;  hats, jackets, shirts, stickers , decals and would like to move on after that to possibly bigger products signs, banners, when I get fully established or good enough

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personally I cut vinyl products for when that product is appropriate - both decals and apparel,  if large enough apparel order I order plastisol transfers which reduce cost on most orders where the same image is used 30+ times (wildgoose is our apparel expert)   for decals I have owned 3 solvent printers and you need enough business to keep that very expensive unit busy every couple of days or the maint will eat you alive if you don't clog heads - the printers I had were $700 per head (my first one had 4 heads and last 2 only had 2 heads) but I found as my wife and I travel more and the printer sat for 3 week vacations I could plan on replacing at least one head a trip.  solvent printers are sexy but there are so many people doing them now the profit has deteriorated.  you can get away from the solvent with a latex printer which doesn't clog heads but requires a special 220 dedicated line and cost more to print.  I am unfamiliar how the latex does with apparel.   banners you can outsource much cheaper than you can make them inhouse.  I quit trying to compete with products so many people already produce and the few printed decals I still offer are done by stickermule like Haumana.   
trade shows area a great way to learn but are hard to come by until the virus subsides - 

maybe start with a good plotter to do cut decals and move into a decent heat press for small one off apparel - which you will have to charge much more than the screen printers can do them for.  get your tax license so you can order from sanmar for your shirts. - you won't be sorry.   Do you have any experience working with vector graphics will be another learning curve as it is quite different than pixel based photos you are used to manipulating - either download signblazer or inkscape just to see what you are getting into and when you order you plotter I suggest the vinylmaster option - it is powerful, the base software that comes with the plotter can be upgraded (there is a discount code for 50 percent off upgrades in the vinylmaster section). 

Get your plotter and start learning - each one is different - I am a hard core graphtec user and have had almost no issues since I worked up to my first one 8+ years ago but the one I got this week and a quirk I need to contact graphtec support about either monday or after I return from a short trip next week.  this is a brand new model and probably one of the first ones produced - - - there will be a learning curve involved in your new venture -  

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Dakotagrafx thank you. No, I have never used vector. I plan on buying my 1st plotter very shortly. Have it down to 3 I'm thinking.

A usctitan28-vmc from uscutter 

 

vs-edg-28-b    or a   vs-spc-28-b

from heat press nation. I'm thinking the titan because it has contour cutting

On 7/25/2020 at 2:06 PM, Dakotagrafx said:

 

about

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11 hours ago, smitay said:

... No, I have never used vector....

You may have used a vector graphics in the past, but simply not know it. I suggest you Google what the differences are between Vector and Raster types of graphics. It might help to give you some insight as to why the cutters will only cut vector graphics. Apparently (the USC version of) VinylMaster Cut has the ability to vectorize a raster image, and that is something that you will need to do at some point. Inkscape is good program that you can design and vectorize.

Raster graphics will pixelate upon scaling, depending on size and dpi, Vector images allow you to scale and still maintain the quality of the image.

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