Totallynutz

Document setup for Printing to be sent to possible outsource?

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I have a customer that needs a design created to have printed .Im still waiting to see what they are actually wanting ,but they have been coming to me for awhile .Soooo  How do i setup my Document first?  Do i use rgb or cmyk and what format etc do i do i save it as like png,tiff.jpeg etc and what resolution should it be saved as for best quality  etc.. I tried looking this up but i guess i dont know the proper words to find what i need. I just bought a monitor calibrator from Datacolor as well. Thank you very much.

B.

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When I'm sending a file for printing at an online producer (banner or vinyl decal), I upload a pdf.

ZooPrinting is one of the largest suppliers of large-format output and they say ---

"File Preparation -- In order to ensure your files are print-ready, we recommend that you upload them in PDF format.

-----  If you are uploading PDF files created in Photoshop, please be sure all layers are flattened. We also accept .JPG (JPEG), .EPS and .TIF (TIFF) file types, however PDF is the preferred format. ---

  1. Use the CMYK colorspace (Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, blacK). These are industry standard printing colors. CMYK colors are different than RGB (Red, Green, Blue), which are used to display colors on your screen.
  2. Use a minimum resolution of 150 dpi at 100% size for image files.
  3. Specify trim area with crop marks. (Don't place crop marks inside the work area.)
  4. Artwork should have 1/8" (0.125") bleed extending past the trim line. This is to prevent minor cutting variations from leaving unintended results at the trim edge.
  5. Safe Area is the 1 1/4" (1.25") area inside the trim line. Do not put critical information or images within the Safe Area. This is to prevent minor cutting variations from leaving unintended results at the trim edge.
  6. If you want printed borders, they must be placed a minimum of 1/8" (0.125") inside the trim line and include bleed. This is to prevent minor cutting variations from leaving unintended results at the trim edge.

 

 

 

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