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ACJ GRAPHICS

what ink for banner printing?

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so i just picked up a designjet 500 cheap and i know it will only print up to 24" banners but for a start that will work for me. i tried a test print and printed ok just that hours later the ink is rubs off seems it isn't dry. rubs off. i used the standard inks that were in printer when i got it. i need to order inks just wanna know which to get. i ordered a roll of the greenstar banner material to just start and learn. well the entire roll doesn't fit on machine so thats a whole other issue lol. but back to original question what kinda inks should i use? thanks in advance

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you will need special aqueous banner material as the water based ink will just lay on top of vinyl - and it won't last nearly as long outdoors as a solvent or latex printer - it will be great for indoor banners though 

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37 minutes ago, Dakotagrafx said:

you will need special aqueous banner material as the water based ink will just lay on top of vinyl - and it won't last nearly as long outdoors as a solvent or latex printer - it will be great for indoor banners though 

isnt the greenstar banner roll( uscutter sells) the proper stuff for banner printing?

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2 hours ago, ACJ GRAPHICS said:

isnt the greenstar banner roll( uscutter sells) the proper stuff for banner printing?

only this one
http://www.uscutter.com/GreenStar-Water-Proof-Block-Out-Scrim-Banner-for-Water-Based-Aqueous-InkjetPrinters-13oz

the others are for latex, eco solvent or rolands uv curable inks - not water based like your printer - 

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we have seen people on the forum in the past confuse the roland eco UV - UV cured ink for the uv resistant water based ink before - the uv cured ink uses a $20,000 printer and special UV lamps to cure this very special UV ink for durable outdoor use.  The UV resistant water based ink that HP uses in some printers basically just adds a little more time before the ink fades and really does not hold up outdoors like the real sign and banner printers (eco solvent, latex, thermo resin) - it is cheap and the printers are cheap but the products they produce will never compete with a printer using ink made to bite into the vinyl and last outdoors for a long time.
Now I see you have been doing this for 3.5 years so I am probably preaching to the choir and you already knew all that, having read the post over the years

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10 hours ago, Dakotagrafx said:

we have seen people on the forum in the past confuse the roland eco UV - UV cured ink for the uv resistant water based ink before - the uv cured ink uses a $20,000 printer and special UV lamps to cure this very special UV ink for durable outdoor use.  The UV resistant water based ink that HP uses in some printers basically just adds a little more time before the ink fades and really does not hold up outdoors like the real sign and banner printers (eco solvent, latex, thermo resin) - it is cheap and the printers are cheap but the products they produce will never compete with a printer using ink made to bite into the vinyl and last outdoors for a long time.
Now I see you have been doing this for 3.5 years so I am probably preaching to the choir and you already knew all that, having read the post over the years

thanks i have actually been doing just vinyl and been wanting to try banner printing. it looks like i'm over my head i got what i thought was good deal on a wide format printer. $400 for a like new hp designjet 500 thought it was pretty cut and dry apparently i have alot more research to do. looks like i may have jumped the gun. so back to the drawing board with this stuff i guess.

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1 hour ago, ACJ GRAPHICS said:

thanks i have actually been doing just vinyl and been wanting to try banner printing. it looks like i'm over my head i got what i thought was good deal on a wide format printer. $400 for a like new hp designjet 500 thought it was pretty cut and dry apparently i have alot more research to do. looks like i may have jumped the gun. so back to the drawing board with this stuff i guess.

aqueous inks like that have to use a media that has a coating sprayed on it to allow the ink to adhere to and that is what fails first over time even when laminated.  going to a trade show like the NBM show in your area is a great place to learn.  it is more than just having a wide format printer, you have to have an ink made to be durable on ourdoor materials that actually become one with that media,   with eco solvent when you print if you pull the vinyl right off the backing it is kinda like wetting paper towels as the ink actually gets into the vinyl.   also learn the maint requirements for the printer you are looking for - most modern eco solvent printer will turn themselves on several times a day to push ink thru the heads to keep the nozzles clear and that ink, although not a lot, goes into a waste tank to be disposed of - I figure about every couple of months I throw away about $60 in ink.   with latex you don't have as much maint but ink cost some more and you have to have special wiring ran (can't just plug into the wall).   
Researching a good RIP program to print with is just as important.  Knowing that once you have clogged nozzles you will probably not be able to clean them and will be replacing heads that cost anywhere from $650 to 2400 (depending on printer model and head used) along with the wipers, dampers, etc and proper printer maint to get the most out of your investment is important (I was naive when I first purchased) - I drove 4 hrs each way to visit someone with a eco solvent printer to learn as much as I could before jumping in.  there are a lot of printers putting out sub par work because they have clogged nozzles, using inferior inks or media to save money and compete by being the cheapest - those are usually the ones that are not around in 2-3 years.  
Research is your friend

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In my opinion, UV ink is good for reasons below:

 

  •  Ecofriendly ink
  • No heat is involved in curing these inks.
  • Most materials will not absorb UV inks and the inks will just stay on th surface of the material giving a more vibrant look.

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4 hours ago, kinjal1 said:

In my opinion, UV ink is good for reasons below:

 

  •  Ecofriendly ink
  • No heat is involved in curing these inks.
  • Most materials will not absorb UV inks and the inks will just stay on th surface of the material giving a more vibrant look.

How often do you have to replace your up bulbs on the curing unit?

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