rocky53204

experimental efforts on glass

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I am newbie experimenting with signage techniques on glass.

I used 'rub n buff' sample pack on the first sign on which the text was sandblasted. I do not like the result of the metallic rub n buff. It is messy as well.

The vinyl mask was mirror cut, weeded and then applied to the back of the 8X10 glass.

I think it looks better without sandblasting with colored paper behind it. (As on the second sign pictured.)

Experiments by definition are not always a success... What do you think?

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I think the problem with the top one is you used too many colors and squiggles.

Oftentimes simpler is better and cleaner.

Sue2

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I've been wanting to use the rub n buff...so...you just sand blast the surface and rub the stuff on? then it just wipes off right the surface you didn't blast...correct?

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49 minutes ago, DNA_Vinyl said:

I've been wanting to use the rub n buff...so...you just sand blast the surface and rub the stuff on? then it just wipes off right the surface you didn't blast...correct?

yes - wipe the rub n buff on - wait a minute and wipe the excess off - works better in courser blasted items of course as it has more to bite into - heard it doesn't work as well with the etch creams as they hardly touch the glass unlike real blasting.  if you let it set too long it can be tougher to remove the excess - what I did was apply the paint, etc and sometimes I remove the mask and sometimes not as it is on the back anyways and further protects the silvering.  we used to have a real master of glass blasting on here but he has moved on after becoming very successful.  he did some silvering himself, antiquing of the silvering and glue chipping with animal glue

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In this case my procedure was to cut the oracal 651 pattern in reverse and apply it to the glass. I than sandblasted in a cabinet with a 50/50 mixture of black blast and aluminum oxide. I then applied the rub n buff to the blasted text, filigree, etc . Once the rub n buff dried I then removed the cut vinyl masking.

The only color I liked was the antique gold which is a poor substitute for gilding.

I hope to try the silvering and glue chipping in future.

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I  like blasting from the back as it looks great and the perceived value as opposed ot the surface blasting and the parallax from the finish on top.  it does not work as well with many cheaper mirrors though as the ones from walmart etc tend to have a cheap tar like coating on the back and most times heavy paper over that - which is hard to remove.  mirror from a glass shop and if you look around (hobby lobby, michaels will many times have mirrors without the messy backing that blast well.  as far as the leaf - the imitation stuff doesn't look too bad for doing stuff like this from the back

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3 hours ago, DNA_Vinyl said:

wait...what's silvering?

A mirror is 'silvered' as a reflective coating. A silver solution is chemically solidified on the glass.

With modern methods of vapor deposition it is likely not an industrial method in current use.

There is a 'second hand'/thrift store in my area which has half price days several days a week. I have found suitable framed mirrors ranging in price from 50 cents to a few dollars.  Apparently not much demand for used mirrors even though they are in good shape. Likewise for framed glass... I remove the pictures. The item pictured came from there.

A local Menards sells 12X12 inch mirror tiles which I may also try.

 

 

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