dosky

can I make profsional decals with epson 9800 pro

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Hello Every body .... please I was aking if I can make or print profesional decals and car side graphics with an epson stylus 9800 pro .... and what do I need for that regarding ink types and vinyl types .... I am strting this as future cureer and any help will be highly apretiated thank you in advance

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Hello Every body .... please I was aking if I can make or print profesional decals and car side graphics with an epson stylus 9800 pro .... and what do I need for that regarding ink types and vinyl types .... I am strting this as future cureer and any help will be highly apretiated thank you in advance

Is the Epson aquious based or solvent based ink...If aquious you will need laminate to have longer durability..If solvent you can still laminate but is not needed most of the time due to the ink already being UV protected...

Solvent ink long term outdoor use ( printable vinyls very inexpensive)..Aquious based short term...( printable vinyls very expensive)

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No. Epsons 9800 uses K3 ink(dye), not solvent. These would not do what you are looking for. Granted you could but a coated vinyl, but the end product is super thick, 12+ mils, and no where near the same quality as printed vinly in appearance, life and conformability.

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Hello Every body .... please I was aking if I can make or print profesional decals and car side graphics with an epson stylus 9800 pro .... and what do I need for that regarding ink types and vinyl types .... I am strting this as future cureer and any help will be highly apretiated thank you in advance

Excuse my humor , but I can't resist commenting on the professional question & your spellin ... ;) . When you stsrt making stuff , do a proof read & or spell check . BTW there is a spell check on the top right of the screen ( abc & a check icon ) . I had no problem understanding your post , but thought it was humorously ironic :thumbsup:

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Real nice, did it occur to you english might not be his/her first language? Nice to see the veterans around here treating the first timers in such a manner.

Dosky, no this printer will not work, you need something that prints with SOLVENT ink, like a Roland or Mutoh or Mimaki. Epson does make a new one that uses solvent ink, but if you are just starting out try to find a good deal on a used one. You will also need a laminator, even with solvent ink a wrap that is not laminated will fade and fail very quickly.

Cheers!

Ben

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Real nice, did it occur to you english might not be his/her first language? Nice to see the veterans around here treating the first timers in such a manner.

Dosky, no this printer will not work, you need something that prints with SOLVENT ink, like a Roland or Mutoh or Mimaki. Epson does make a new one that uses solvent ink, but if you are just starting out try to find a good deal on a used one. You will also need a laminator, even with solvent ink a wrap that is not laminated will fade and fail very quickly.

Cheers!

Ben

Solvent ink is fade resistant for 3-5 years according to specs on my Mutoh..Yes I know conditions dictate how long and how much but to just make the blanket statement that sol decals will fail quickly is not great advice to a newbie...It will also depend on the quality of the vinyl upon which you print that makes a big difference in long term use as well...No lam or too lam thats always been a question for us printers..Lam is expensive and does make your product last longer I agree, but to not lam makes a good choice for the customer as well...

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Solvent ink is fade resistant for 3-5 years according to specs on my Mutoh..Yes I know conditions dictate how long and how much but to just make the blanket statement that sol decals will fail quickly is not great advice to a newbie...It will also depend on the quality of the vinyl upon which you print that makes a big difference in long term use as well...No lam or too lam thats always been a question for us printers..Lam is expensive and does make your product last longer I agree, but to not lam makes a good choice for the customer as well...

Agreed, for short term applications like temporary wraps you can get away with not laminating. Debating the multitude of vinyl/ink/exposure variables is pointless as you said given that any number of reasons can cause a wrap to fail. At our shop however we do not send out any wraps that will be on the vehicle for more than a month without lamination. The upfront cost far outweighs the anger & frustration down the road for the customer when they have to pay us upwards of a 1000 dollars to remove the old faded wrap & adhesive, & then design, print and install a whole NEW wrap because some crappy shop talked them into taking the cheap route & told them Oracal or whoever have 3 to 5 year fade warranties which is not the case.

Regardless, point being is if the OP wants to get into the vinyl wrap business he/she will NEED a laminator in order to be able to supply long term high quality wraps, the same way they need to use good quality vinyls & inks & proper installation techniques along with all the rest of the tools & equipment, or they are doomed to produce nothing but temporary wraps & spend eternity doing free warranty repairs.

Ben

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Agreed, for short term applications like temporary wraps you can get away with not laminating. Debating the multitude of vinyl/ink/exposure variables is pointless as you said given that any number of reasons can cause a wrap to fail. At our shop however we do not send out any wraps that will be on the vehicle for more than a month without lamination. The upfront cost far outweighs the anger & frustration down the road for the customer when they have to pay us upwards of a 1000 dollars to remove the old faded wrap & adhesive, & then design, print and install a whole NEW wrap because some crappy shop talked them into taking the cheap route & told them Oracal or whoever have 3 to 5 year fade warranties which is not the case.

Regardless, point being is if the OP wants to get into the vinyl wrap business he/she will NEED a laminator in order to be able to supply long term high quality wraps, the same way they need to use good quality vinyls & inks & proper installation techniques along with all the rest of the tools & equipment, or they are doomed to produce nothing but temporary wraps & spend eternity doing free warranty repairs.

Ben

The OP asked about decals and car graphics..All of which can be done with and without lam for sure..I agree on the total car wrap being the best to lam to make it longer life...I am not into the wraps as you are and most definitly agree with doing it right the first time for something with as much at stake as a wrap..

Hope the OP understands a wrap is different from a window decal in how it's approached and installed...

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You are correct, when he/she used the term "Car side graphics" my brain is programmed to immediately think wraps LOL! :thumbsup:

Ben

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Real nice, did it occur to you english might not be his/her first language? Nice to see the veterans around here treating the first timers in such a manner.

Keeping it real boop . Does not matter about the native language , I think it is sound advise for anybody wanting to go into the vinyl business ... ESPECIALLY on a Professional level . I did not treat them bad AT ALL ,I stated it was in humor & left some incorrect spelling in my post . They asked for any help & I consider my post/advice positive help . Only a very sensitive person would take offense to my post . Everybody else would appreciate the honesty , humor & camaraderie shown by joking with them .

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The OP asked about decals and car graphics..All of which can be done with and without lam for sure..I agree on the total car wrap being the best to lam to make it longer life...I am not into the wraps as you are and most definitly agree with doing it right the first time for something with as much at stake as a wrap..

Hope the OP understands a wrap is different from a window decal in how it's approached and installed...

I still don't see how vehicle graphics can be "professional" if it's printed on a dye ink printer. It needs to be laminated for it to be colorfast when it's exposed to all the elements, and with lamination, it'll be too thick to be applied to a vehicle even if it's just a decal... just a thought...

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I still don't see how vehicle graphics can be "professional" if it's printed on a dye ink printer. It needs to be laminated for it to be colorfast when it's exposed to all the elements, and with lamination, it'll be too thick to be applied to a vehicle even if it's just a decal... just a thought...

Laminates are used all the time on decals and doesn't seem to creat a problem with application on a vehicle as long as you don't have to conform to a bend or sharp turn..hence the fact of using conformable car wrap material if thats your application...Not sure what problems you have had, but I have not had those issues with applying decals with or without laminate myself...

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