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  1. 4 points
    I created these signs for businesses remaining open during the crisis.
  2. 4 points
    Google (images) is your Friend.
  3. 3 points
    Also remember there's nothing wrong with a used cutter. I bought a used Summa D-60 in 2008 for way less than the $1000 you've got set aside for a cutter. I've been very happy with it so far. They are probably one of the best tracking cutters on the market. I had to replace the power supply and the cutting strip over the years., but that's it. I run Kleen Kut bladesand it jut keeps cutting. List price on a new Summa D-60 is $2290.00 Here's one if you're handy and can replace the X axis belt and live near Roanoke, Virginia. It's on eBay with a starting bid of $100.00 come with a computer as well. The media flanges that come with the cutter that are laying on top are one accessory that also aid in tracking of the vinyl. https://www.ebay.com/itm/184220275643?ViewItem=&item=184220275643 Found the belt for $91.84 https://www.digiprint-supplies.com/en/summacut-assy-y-belt-d60-399-631-pbesusu6014.html?category= As MZ Skeeter said Graphtec are excellent also. Another one to look into is Roland.
  4. 3 points
    If you have never ran a vinyl cutter before, then don't start with cutting a design. First you need to start with the TEST feature and set your vinyl cutter up. That is what the TEST feature is for. You have to set your blade depth, blade offset, and force first. Then type some text on your layout screen directly from the software and cut it. We don't know what kind of design you are cutting or whether it is even a vector design. Practice with typing text first and learn your cutter. This is the correct way to set your blade depth, which must be correct, before you set your other settings. Every cutter has to be fine tuned to cut correctly. This is correct way to set your blade depth. To start with, you should set your blade depth correctly, by taking the blade holder out of the machine, and firmly cut across a piece of scrap vinyl, you will be cutting. You should only be cutting the vinyl and barely a mark on wax paper backing, Adjust blade to get there, Then put the blade holder back in machine, and use the force of the machine to get there, same results, only cutting the vinyl and barely a mark in wax paper backing. You should just barely see and feel your blade tip out of the blade holder.
  5. 3 points
    Just an update to the future googlers - you were correct, I needed to purchase an upgrade to the VM software. it was 50% off and a business account so bada-bing. Punch out is now available along with much more functionality. Made a couple adjustments - heres the final product. Thanks all - you can close the thread
  6. 3 points
    I was bored so.. Deleted everything but the green and text then just did 3 "outline" or whatever it would be called in your program. I used graphtec pro studio. I know, the "white" outline is yellow, that was so you could see it was there. mailbox.eps
  7. 3 points
    It looks to be Valencia Sans with a Stroke and Warp added.
  8. 3 points
    It greatly depends on the initial image. Most auto trace systems have a lot of stray/necessary nodes and to get a good clean cut a good bit of work can be required to clean up the file. The higher quality the initial image the better the trace will be. Images with multiple colors can result in some odd vectors. Either colors layered on top of each other, or they are sized exactly as seen which typically is not a good way to cut either. A simple example say a black square with a red circle in it. Some trace programs will give you a black square with a hole in it, and a red circle. There's nothing wrong with this, but for cutting and layering, it would be better to just have a black square with no hole, and then layer the red circle on top of it. Some programs would trace that same image as a red square, with a black square with a hole in it, layered on top of the red square. If you want to play around before buying anything, download Inkscape, it's free. Play around with it a little and you'll get a better understanding of vector graphics.
  9. 3 points
    Ok, so if you're cutting 6mil vinyl, ie 0.006" thick, and you have your blade set to 1/32, ie 0.03125", that is 5.2 times too much blade exposed. Not to be rude, and I run into this at work as well, if you ask a subject mater expert for help, don't ignore it when it is not the answer you were expecting.
  10. 3 points
    But for $21 more you can get a brand new 28" SC2 on sale at $399 https://www.uscutter.com/USCutter-SC2-Series-Vinyl-Cutter
  11. 2 points
    The first step is to admit you have an addiction.
  12. 2 points
    Read this: https://www.iifuture.com/shared/info/en/vm/crossgrade.html
  13. 2 points
    Sounds like you were relying on the software to detect that your design is too big. Personally I try never to rely on software to detect things like that and always layout my design as I want it cut.
  14. 2 points
    I agree. Having at least 2 programs available make thing a lot faster and easier at times.
  15. 2 points
    You might also look into Inkscape (it's free). I understand wanting to learn one software and use it for everything but I've found Inkscape more intuitive than I have with VM. That could also be that I learned Inkscape first, I don't know. But I know I could do this shape in Inkscape much faster than I could in VM.
  16. 2 points
    Not only does it depend on the cutter, making those cuts, it depends on the user setting the cutter up correctly. A vinyl cutter is not plug and play. Value cutters like the SC Liyu series take more time fine tuning, and to start with you must set the blade depth correctly. The cutter force, and blade offset depends on setting the blade depth correctly. Start with a slow speed until you learn your cutter. Do NOT follow any blade depth instructions about using a credit card to set the blade depth. This is correct way to set your blade depth. To start with, you should set your blade depth correctly, by taking the blade holder out of the machine, and firmly cut across a piece of scrap vinyl, you will be cutting. You should only be cutting the vinyl and barely a mark on wax paper backing, Adjust blade to get there, Then put the blade holder back in machine, and use the force of the machine to get there, same results, only cutting the vinyl and barely a mark in wax paper backing. You should just barely see and feel your blade tip out of the blade holder.
  17. 2 points
    How small? I have a Graphtec 6000 and was impressed how well my machine cut this swirly floral design that my sister picked out. That's the tip of an X-acto blade. Of course, the cutter blade was nice and sharp and I used Siser EW. But this was still a job to weed! 1/4 inch is about as small as I want to cut lettering.
  18. 2 points
  19. 2 points
    Layering wouldn't make it shrink more/faster but it might make it more obvious. The layers will pull on each other and cause distortions more so than a single layer.
  20. 2 points
    My "go to" program is CorelDraw. It's quite versatile as you can create both raster and vector designs, flyers, etc.... I have Illustrator but have never been comfortable with it...too intricate for what I do. PLUS, I don't like their new "rental" only program... At least you can still buy a disk for Corel.
  21. 2 points
    Just because an image is converted to a vector file, doesn't mean it's cuttable.
  22. 2 points
    Measurements do not matter, you set your blade depth to what you are cutting. Sign vinyl, stencil, whatever.
  23. 2 points
    Yes, start with very little blade tip out,(your only going to be using the very tip of the blade) just make a straight cut across the vinyl. you can tell right away, in just a few inches of vinyl. Don't do sharp turns. Just cut it straight. Correct, you could be breaking the blade tips off doing that with max blade out. You just want to get the blade cutting the vinyl and barely making a mark on the wax paper backing. Then put the blade holder back in the machine and get the same results, with the force. Look really good in the blade holder for pieces of vinyl stuck in it. Add a drop of light oil in the holder. 3-1, sewing machine, etc.
  24. 2 points
    Let side, second down. Change "send mode" to send now.
  25. 2 points
    Technically any plotter can contour cut, the trick is getting everything lined up correctly. When you say you're not having any luck, what exactly is the problem you're having? So long as the design is not too large or complex the tracking on the MH should be good enough to do contour cutting, it'll just be a matter of getting things lined up right to start.